Breaking the Logjam

Nothing puts pressure on a political blogger like being noted as a political blogger to read a week before elections. That said, here comes a humblebrag: I’ve gotten a lot of nudges lately to write, please write (as well as run, please run). It’s nice to hear that, not gonna be shy about saying so. But there are reasons why I haven’t been writing. Some of those reasons are personal and won’t be shared on this blog. But many of them have to do with the gravity of these midterm elections, locally, statewide and nationally.

I take this stuff seriously – why else would I put time and energy and thought into talking about, writing about and getting personally involved in politics? But what this taking things seriously has led to is a logjam…

Merriam Webster: a situation in which a large number of logs floating down a river become tangled with each other so that further movement is not possible : a situation in which no progress seems possible

Merriam Webster: a situation in which a large number of logs floating down a river become tangled with each other so that further movement is not possible
: a situation in which no progress seems possible

What’s it take to break a logjam? Ha. I’ve thought I had the answer many times since my last blog post. And what a calming post that was – and what a calm timeframe it represents.

But that was then – just around my birthday in the middle of a beautiful summer, far away from the May 2014 primary election, and this is now – less than eight days away from the November 2014 general election.

My main contribution at this point is to do what I always do, which is to encourage people to engage in the next week. Here are 13 ways I thought of just off the top of my head. Contact a volunteer coordinator and they’ll give you more:

  • Vote, make calls, send postcards.
  • Give money, go door to door, send emails.
  • Have a meet and greet, donate stamps, be a surrogate.
  • Take a friend to the polls, hold signs at the polls, volunteer for a candidate or an issue on election day.
  • Stick a yard sign – or two or three or four – in your yard.

Not sure who to vote for? Ask someone you trust – a spouse, a partner, a colleague. Although online guides are helpful, as both a candidate and a producer of online content, I find that speaking with someone you know is preferable. But if the people you know don’t know the people you have to consider, then check the online guides:

Every newspaper you can find online has an opinion section with editorial endorsements. You can read those. Most candidates, though not all, have websites. You can read those. Many candidates, though not all, have Facebook pages. Some even have Twitter feeds. You can check out all those sources to form an opinion.

I’m mostly keeping my opinions about this election cycle to myself, unless asked, because the focus needs to be on helping people we believe in win. But if you want to ask me, go ahead. I’m opening up the comments section for the first time since the redesign. Let’s hope I don’t end up back on Google’s bad side.

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